Posts tagged ‘sales coach Denver’

September 10, 2009

What You Pay Attention To Grows

We have all taken a beaten from the media this last year. All the negative news about the economy and the recession can be overwhelming. I even had one anxious client say, “It feels like the world is coming to an end.”

Take a moment to think of something that happened in your past that seemed very bad at the time, but now in retrospect you see what a blessing it was.

I absolutely know that the challenges we are facing economically now will look like a blessing in retrospect. Businesses will get stronger and leaner. Families will come together. Governments will change. People will remember what faith is. Programs and non-profits will emerge as well as all the positive change we cannot yet see.

I invite all of you to step into hope and give up the worry and concern. How effective can you be when you are worried? How productive are you when you are anxious? How creative are you when you are upset?

Of course, I believe that positive thinking is important for many reasons. If only for your peace of mind, I invite you to stay focused on what is right, what is working and what is good in your business and in your life. What you pay attention to grows and thrives!

August 27, 2009

Leadership Institute

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WHAT: M3 Race Leadership Institute
Nurture and Enhance the power of community to successfully grow your business and yourself.

WHEN: Thursday, September 24th thru Saturday, September 26th, 2009

WHERE: Office Depot headquarters in Boca Raton, Florida.

We at Count Me In believe that entrepreneurship equals leadership, and so do our partners at Office Depot. Leadership takes vision and discipline, creativity and tenacity, risk-taking, earth-shaking, courage, confidence and commitment. It also takes a strong community– this one. Our Leadership Institute will help you successfully grow your business and yourself.

Featured Workshop: Select, Hire & Retain Top Talent – Alicia Marie Fruin

Want To Create Your Dream Team? Now you can! In this workshop you will:
• Craft a strategic plan to build your team
• Learn how to profile roles and write accurate job descriptions
• Design targeted job ads that attract the right people
• Develop the skills to recognize and retain top talent
• Get great interviewing tips and a FREE CD of materials you can use in your business.

Here’s what you’ll experience:

* Two tracks of powerful workshops taught by experts in their fields
* Elevator Business Pitch Updates
* Vendor Matching by WBENC connecting your product or service with corporations, universities, hospitals or government agencies interested in doing business with you. (Separate registration required– Click here to register)
* Panels, speakers and some creative surprises
* Plus lots of time to share with and learn from each other, one of the hallmarks of the Count Me In community
* Shuttle service between hotel and Office Depot available
* Valet Parking at Office Depot

Click here to register!

July 16, 2009

Happiness Is Positive Cash Flow!

“Cash flow, not profits, is the lifeblood of your business. Project it, monitor it, and manage it well before serious trouble starts to brew.”

In today’s uncertain economy with ever rising interest rates, many small businesses with limited financial training are having problems staying alive, let alone prospering. In fact, 63% of new businesses don’t survive six years– and most work-at-home people fail within 6 months!

The primary reason is bad cash management. Too many self-employed people neglect their cash flow until it is too late to recover. So the big question is: How will you manage your cash flow effectively? If you are not sure, then you are on shaky ground.

Let’s break down these tips one at a time.

Fast Collection

In your business, you should collect money as fast as you can. To do so, try these four things:

• Try to speed up customer orders by having them e-mail their orders to you straight from your website.
• Send out your invoices the same day goods are shipped, not a week or two later.
• Indicate on your invoice when payment is due, and specify the penalty interest for late payment. Enforce late fees.

Deposit Money Fast!

This seems only obvious, but it’s extremely important.

Always deposit checks the same day they are received. Don’t hold checks until the next day because you lose one day’s float. Key point: you can lose three days of float by not depositing Friday’s checks until Monday.

• Compare pricing for merchant credit card services; run credit cards as soon as payment due.
• Obtain availability of 0 to 2 days on deposited checks. Don’t let your bank give you the customer availability of 1 to 5 days. Be persistent. Ask the bank for its “availability schedule” and scan it to be sure you’re receiving fast availability of two days or less.
• Each bank has its own availability schedule. This is used to assign check availability to consumers, business (commercial accounts), and large corporate accounts. Availability is the number of days until you can use the money deposited by check as cash. For example, a $1,000 check deposited today and assigned a one-day availability can be withdrawn as cash tomorrow.
• Don’t deposit checks in a bank’s Automated Teller Machine or use the Night Depository since you have no evidence that you actually deposited the checks you said you did. Remember, you only receive a receipt that shows the time and dollar amount on the deposit at the ATM, and you get no receipt at the Night Depositor.
• Ask your bank about its deadline for receiving availability on deposited checks. Some banks may require a deposit of an encoded check by 2 p.m., even though the bank is open to 5 p.m. Make sure you make this deadline, otherwise you lose one day’s float.
• Before using a bank’s ATM for check deposits, find out the bank’s availability deadline. Some banks have a 12 noon cut-off time which means that any checks deposited later are considered to be deposited the next day! In that case, you lose an entire day’s float, even though you did your bit to get the checks cashed.

Have a Super Tight Accounts Receivable Policy

Many people think it is no big deal to neglect accounts receivable until bills are collectible. This is bad cash flow policy. Here are seven excellent tips for handling accounts receivable:

• Check the financial health of a new customer before offering them credit. One way of doing this is by using a rating service, such as Dun & Bradstreet (1-800-234-3867).
• Ask a new customer for five business references and don’t neglect to call them.
• Don’t offer too generous discounts, such as 3% for payment in 10 days. A better rate is 1.5% cash discount. It costs you less.
• Charge a “late fee” of 2% per month to customers who pay late and charge back customers who take discounts after the discount periods.
• Follow up on late payers with phone calls and letters. These may seem a bit extreme, but the first letter should go out the very day the amount is one day late! After 30 days late, start this sequence:
     o send out a letter from your attorney
     o turn over the account to a collection agency
     o use a collection attorney
• Don’t send out new merchandise if bills remain unpaid. Remember that bad debts hurt your bottom line! Be vigilant and try to get at least periodic payments from slow payers.
• Instruct your bank to automatically deposit “returned checks.” Ask your bank if they offer Return Item box service. If they do, then use it to redeposit your check and charge back the bank return item free to your customer.

These seven steps are tough and unrelenting, but they may make the difference between a positive cash flow month and a sluggish month for your business.

Disburse Your Money Slowly

Just the opposite of collecting at the earliest possible moment, you should never pay a day sooner than you have to, unless you get a discount for doing so. A lot of people believe in staying ahead of bills and paying them as early as possible, but that’s just poor cash management. You want to keep your money in your hands as long as you can. Here are five suggestions to slow down your disbursements:

• Pay your invoices on the last day they’re due, not before.
• Try to mail your payment on Thursday or Friday to pick up a few extra days mail float over the weekend.
• Use business credit cards for travel, lodging, meals, and small expenses for yourself and your employees. With credit cards you typically don’t have to make payment until 25 days after receiving the statement. Use this float by investing the money. In total, you can typically keep your money invested for 45 days from date of purchase.
• Don’t issue advances to employees. Have them use their personal credit cards or business cards, if you provide them.
• Now, many small businesses neglect to reconcile their monthly bank statements or assume that the bank never makes a mistake. Banks do make mistakes, and you must stay on top of your disbursement to control your cash flow. If you are one of those people who simply can’t stand to balance you check book, you can use a bank’s standard account reconcilement services for a low monthly price — $50 to $100 base charge and 5 to 7 cents a check.

No Extra Money in Your Bank Account

Many businesses make the mistake of keeping too much money in their bank accounts to pay for bank services. This money could be used more effectively elsewhere — such as to pay off a loan or to invest at a more competitive rate. Many businesses have no idea how much money to leave in the bank or what alternatives they have to compensate the bank. Take some time to find out what your minimum balance needs to be.

Get an Account Analysis Statement

How do you know how much money (bankers refer to this as “balances”) to leave in your checking account to pay for bank’s services? That’s a question that more business owners should be asking themselves.

• First, get a price list which shows how much your bank charges for services like account maintenance, checks deposited, checks paid, stop payments and wire transfers.
• Ask the bank to send you a monthly “Account Analysis Statement.” The analysis statement contains the average balance levels for the month — both the ledger and the available balance — as well as a listing of services used, their transaction volumes and cost. This statement should be obtained in addition to the regular monthly bank statement.
• Look at the account analysis to see whether you are overcompensating the bank. Then pull out any excess funds and invest them in a high-yielding money market mutual fund, for example.

A word of advice: Smaller banks may not know what you are talking about when you ask for an account analysis. Larger banks often offer such a statement, but you have to ask for it. And don’t let them charge you for this kind of statement since it is only an invoice.

Inventory is Not Cash

Every item you have sitting on your shelf should eventually be transformed into cash in your bank account, and the sooner the better. As long as it’s inventory, it’s basically dead weight. If it is not moving, you’re not having cash flow.

Here are six recommendations to minimize the cost of your inventory:

• Attempt to forecast as accurately as you can the day, week and month what you expect to sell. There is software for this.
• If you are dealing in more than one item, determine which item accounts for 80% of your sales. Then minimize ordering other items that are selling poorly or infrequently.
• Determine how fast you can get inventory, once you order it. Try to order as late as you can. Some firms can use “just-in-time” inventory which enables them to receive their order the day they need it.
• Determine your economic order quantity and don’t order too much inventory just to save a few pennies.
• Shop around and make sure you are getting competitive prices.
• Develop a policy for determining obsolete inventory, and how you can get rid of it. The best way to get rid of dead inventory is to sell it whatever you can get for it, even if that’s only 10 percent of what you paid for it. At least it will generate cash flow.

Don’t Forget Continuity Sales

Once of the most exceptional ways of controlling and improving cash flow well into the future is by employing something called continuity of sales or services.

Continuity sales are simply a contract to purchase products or services on an installment basis for a fixed period of time.

The best example of a continuity sale is a magazine subscription. 12, 24, or 36 issues delivered each month for X amount of dollars. The bigger the subscription, they better deal you get. The publisher gets more money up front, and the customer gets a better deal in the long run. Continuity can apply to anything.

Let’s say you own a dry cleaning business. How about an annual deal to clean 5 shirts or blouses per week for set amount of money? Get people to pay your for the entire week up front for a lot of fast cash flow. You’ll trade a discount for getting business, but you’ll ensure a steady cash flow for months to come. Continuity works with just about any kind of product or service you are offering, from dry cleaning to our personal consulting service.

You can structure payments for continuity sales on almost any basis, but it’s best by far to go for complete payment up front. After all, the discount is based on a customer’s commitment, and they’ll be a lot more committed with their money on the line.

July 9, 2009

Halfway through the Leading Change program… Hear what participants have to say!

“The Leading Change series has helped me to better understand the importance of self care, self expression, and clear intentions in being an effective leader to others. Through a progressive series of coaching conversations, theoretical models, and development exercises, I have created breakthroughs in leadership that have re-energized me and moved me closer to fulfilling my purpose in life.”

Karina Miller – Human Resources Specialist

“I highly recommend the Leading Change program for anyone ready to take that next step of personal growth as a leader. The synergy of working with a group of highly-talented, committed individuals in a safe environment has been life-changing. Leading Change should be on every leader’s calendar for this year.”

Pam O’Bryant, Manager

 

“I have so much energy now that I have identified and freed myself up emotionally!”

Lois Pearson, Business Owner

 

“The Leading Change program has changed my life in a profound way. It is an intense program asking students to be courageous and to dig deep to look at their fear and then transform that fear into power. I thought since I had been through years of intense counseling and many other coaching programs that I knew my motivators. It turns out I was close but then with Alicia’s probing and kind of proding, she brought me to be very clear on the specific fear that was holding me back so I could come to the other side of fear: standing in your power; standing in leadership.

Coming into focus with my fear and being very specific about how it feels and how it has affected my life has allowed me to step back and notice others fear and to have compassion and love toward them as they too identify and notice behaviors that stem from fear. This has allowed me to choose to remain in my own center, notice their fear and how it shows up for them and not be affected by their fear. I can notice and choose my own behaviors that now are generated from a place of love and power versus being generated by fear.

Alicia is a talented, fun, spiritually and practically grounded coach and mentor. While guiding me in the deepest way with honor and respect she also teaches me to laugh at my human-ness and play with new experiences. She is one of the most gifted coaches I have ever had the honor to work with.”

Ann Marie Archer, Business Owner

 

New Leading Change program starts July 24th. Click here for more information or call us at (512) 989-2230.

May 26, 2009

How to be “Coachable”

So, you finally decided to give coaching a shot. Good for you! I have noticed that the issue with choosing to get a coach or not has more to do with trusting yourself to really leverage coaching, than the issues of time or money.

Here are some ways to make sure you get what you came for.

• Work with your coach to articulate exactly what you want- be specific. If this is difficult, on an ongoing basis hone your coaching goals with your coach until they are very sharp, distinct and measurable. Do not move to strategy or plans until this is clear.

• The conversation should be 80% you talking and 20% coach talking. However, let your coach guide the conversation. In other words stop on occasion and let the coach ask some probing questions. Let go of control.

• Do not tell stories; we do not need the whole story to coach you. This can really drain the time away from a session. We need to know what you want, why you want that and what are the barriers.

• Practice making your point in the coaching conversation.

• Suspend and let go of judging yourself, your results and your coach. Curiosity, creativity and unprecedented results occur in an environment of “no judgment”.

• Be willing to be uncomfortable and think outside the box.

• Coaching is a process, not a one time deal. The momentous process of engaging in a provocative conversation over and over is what creates the break through result. Stay committed to the process, it works.

• In coaching focus on “who you are being” as well as “what you are doing”.

• Maintain the integrity of the relationship. In other words:

1. Keep your word and acknowledge breaking your word when you do.

2. Let your coach know if conversation or process is not working for you.

3. Turn in your promised deliverables; they record and maintain the structure of your program.

4. Stick to your coaching schedule as much as possible.

5. Clear the deck; remove all distractions.

6. You are 100% responsible for 100% of your goals, action plans & results. Your coach is not there to blame or give credit to.

Listen to some actual coaching calls here!

May 21, 2009

ICF Global Coaching Client Study

The main purpose of the ICF Global Coaching Client Study is to generate a broad scope of reliable data on those individuals who have experienced professional coaching and the results they achieved from it. More specifically, the key questions this study is designed to answer are:

􀂅 What is the demographic profile of coaching clients?

􀂅 What are the characteristics of the coaching experience?

􀂅 Why do clients seek coaching services?

􀂅 What does the decision making process for choosing a specific coach look like?

􀂅 What are clients’ perceptions of the industry and the service it provides?

􀂅 How do clients evaluate their experience?

􀂅 How are clients benefiting from the coaching experience?

􀂅 What is the return on investment (ROI) from coaching?

May 20, 2009

June Coaching Tip for Managers

Assumptions can be the downfall of an otherwise great manager-coach. It’s easy to think we know what someone needs or we know what someone will say. I have discovered that when I ask a few more questions I am much less likely to make this mistake. If this is you, here are several questions to add to your tool kit.

Questions for clarity- Eliminate assumptions

1. What do you mean by that?

 2. It seems as if you are saying ________? Did I get that right?

3. Say more about that?

4. How is this different?

5. Anything else about that?

6. What do you think it could be?

7. Tell me more.

8. What else?

May 5, 2009

May Coaching Tip

Powerful Questioning is at the core of effective coaching. With one caveat– understand that asking a question that is appropriate to the emotional state, learning style, timing and situation is as important as the actual question. This takes effective listening, skill and practice.

Elements of a great question:

  • They are clear and direct.
  • They are non-judgmental.
  • They are transparent– no motive.
  • They are real and have the best interest of the employee in mind.
  • They are inquisitive and keep the employee thinking and in curiosity.
  • They are based in the present and keep the employee in the ‘here and now’ versus the ‘why’.

Why ask questions instead of give directions?

  • Your answers are old answers and they work for you, not the person you are coaching.
  • If you ask questions, people will self-discover and take responsibility for their results. People really do like their own ideas better!
March 12, 2009

Leading Change Program: How to cope with our own fear and lead others through change

The natural cycle of life’s ups and downs creates growth or personal fears and blockages. Which of these dominates depends a lot on how we view change. Is it exciting or is it frightening?

 

Who is watching? Your employees, your family, your community? If you are a leader then you are modeling how to navigate our current economic crisis. Will you step up and face your fear so we can all grow and thrive? We call fear by a lot of names: overwhelm, anxiety, frustration, pride, anger. We rarely say, “I am afraid.” The leading change program is for leaders who are grappling with their own fears while also leading others.

 

I wrote this intro below so you would understand that this program is confronting, rigorous and deeply powerful. It requires courage and self awareness. I believe it has the power to completely alter who you are as a leader and a human being.

We will work on:

 

  • Understanding fear and how to be facile with it
  • Real power
  • Integrity
  • Language
  • Communication
  • Being a visionary
  • Understanding your core values and honoring the values of others

 

We know change is part of life yet we go to great lengths to make our world predictable, safe, comfortable, controllable and definable. In general, we don’t understand our fear and how we as human beings operate with it. When we have a lot of fear, we go about setting up a world that does not stimulate our particular fear(s). We use our mind to devise ways to avoid having our fear stimulated. Fear is afraid of itself and does not want to be felt. You can do one of two things with fear. You can recognize it for what it is and stop acting on it. Or you can try to keep the world from stimulating your fear.

 

We all do it. Yet we don’t talk about it. You know, try to figure out how things are supposed to be and then go about trying to make it that way. How did we come up with the idea that life is not okay as it is? If change is natural maybe life is too.

 

As a coach, I have noticed that our attempts to protect ourselves from our problems create more problems. If you keep attempting to arrange people, places, and events so that they do not disturb your fear, life will feel heavy because you are controlling and fighting with everything. Most of us try to get to peace this way. Most of us try to get to joy this way. What if there is another way?

 

This program starts in April, is 5 months – 15 sessions and is a “Pay what you can program”.  Please respond to coaching@profitconsultingco.com if you are interested and I will send an application. Only 8 leaders will be accepted and I will accept applications through March 27.

March 4, 2009

Business Coaching Facts

In every industry there are common myths, misunderstandings, fictional stories and personal opinions. Business coaching is no different. The more popular this industry becomes the more susceptible it become to false allegations.

This article helps to shed some light on this industry and provide you with some business coaching facts. Many of the business coaching facts found in this article are courtesy of survey results provided by the International Coach Federation. Others are the finding of separate studies.

Fact: There are over 25, 000 business coaches in the U.S. alone. Many of them coach both online and offline businesses. While business coaching may seem like the new kid on the block, the truth is the foundation is well established.

Fact: Over 40% of Fortune 500 companies use business coaching. Business coaching is not just for inexperienced entrepreneurs. Even large corporations and people with MBA’s utilize business coaching. Fact: Coaching is about learning not teaching. Coaches are not teachers. They can teach you a lot but they are not there to teach you how to run your business. They may not know how to do things better than the client. A coach can observe patterns and set the stage for new actions and then work with the individual to put these new, more successful actions into place. They are not there to do the work for you.

Fact: Most clients do not turn to coaches simply for monetary advice. They turn to their coach for help on time management as well as career guidance and business advice. To a lesser but still significant extent, they seek coaching on relationships, family, wellness and spirituality. Fact: 98.5% of coaching clients said their investment in a coach was well worth the money Fact: Coaching is a process not an event. The true process of coaching requires getting at the ‘root cause’ of deficiency. If your company is lagging there is a reason. Business coaching is need to help get to the root cause. You have to be willing to accept the cause, overcome it and then begin changing the effect it has on you and your business. All of this is a process.

Fact: Coaching is not the same as consulting or counseling. Coaching is about creating a mutual beneficial alliance. Coaching looks at businesses holistically.

Fact: 61% of clients report having greater job satisfaction due to coaching. Fact: Coaching can produce a 529% return on investment and significant subtle benefits to the business.

Fact: Not all business coaching firms are genuine. They will try to set up cult-like organizations. These organizations try to control businesses, push products on them, and do not have the business owner’s best interest at heart. This is why it is important to research an organization thoroughly, and ask your coach for qualifications and references before continuing to work with them.

Fact: The number one role of a coach, according to most clients, is to be a sounding board. They want a coach who will really listen to them and provide honest feedback. They also use them as motivators, friends, mentors and spiritual guides.

Fact: More than two thirds of clients attributed to their coaching a higher level of self awareness, smarter goal setting and a more balanced life. These Business Coaching facts should help you see what you can get out of coaching but also what you may have been wrong about. A business coach helps your business performance by giving you an outside perspective. They don’t build your business for you, complete tasks for you nor should they compare clients or coworkers within an organization. They help you reach your business goal by deciphering what is limiting your progress.

Lyn Troyer and his Niche Power Group teach beginners how to make money online in niche markets with affiliate marketing. Please visit their online business mentoring website http://nichepowergroup.com Source: http://www.submityourarticle.com Permalink: http://www.submityourarticle.com/a.php?a=53059