Archive for ‘Coaching- Business, Wellness, Career, Life’

December 31, 2011

“The Gift of Presence” by Ellen Palmer

“This year I was given a present so valuable that I couldn’t possibly keep it all for myself.   So today, I am paying it forward.

It all started this summer when I had a simple accident at the shore that resulted in a serious concussion.  I tried blowing it off, but ended up with a CAT scan and the following advice from my doctors “no activity and absolutely no multitasking until the headaches subside in a few months.” A few months?!  They further explained that no activity meant no TV, no reading, no movies, no talking on the phone, no running, jumping or playing, no computer and no working.   Seriously, there wasn’t much left except staring at the wall, sleeping, and observing.   So that is what I did, I observed the following:

1)    We are bombarded with noise, images and multiple simultaneous tasks all day. It’s amazing that we can hear ourselves think let alone be present to truly listen to someone else.

2)    We are rushed and we are rushing.

3)    Because we live in this rushed, distracted world, it is very hard to stay focused on who we are with or what we are doing at the time.  We are not truly engaged in the moment.

4)    If we aren’t present in the moment, we aren’t really listening and connecting with those around us.  We are disconnected, separate and often at odds.

5)    If we are at odds, we aren’t usually feeling happiness or comfort, but we are too busy to know how to fix it.   Good news ~ I now know.

Because we couldn’t have any noise in the house this summer, I would sit with my family at night and we would talk or play cards together.  There weren’t any “screens” to distract us and we had some of the best conversations we’ve had as a family.   We truly engaged with each other because we weren’t rushed.   We were actually paying attention to what each of us had to say!   We were present in the moment.  We all felt loved and that time together was one of the most rewarding, unexpected gifts I have ever received.

Many of us are missing the truly joyful connections that come from being present in the moment. Perhaps like us, you didn’t intend to be distracted or disconnected from the ones you love.  It just happens.   When life returned to normal after the concussion for us, we crept back into a few bad habits, but we now know what to do.  We took the “day off” together yesterday, went out to lunch and went to the movies.    We made time to truly engage with one another.

The holidays are the perfect time to reconnect.   Perhaps the least expensive, yet most rewarding gift you can give this year is your presence.”

______________________________________________________________________

Ellen Palmer is a People Biz client that attributes her recent positive changes and insights to her participation in the Leading Change Program.  Ellen Palmer is a Holistic Health Counselor, LIfestyle Change Coach and Public Speaker. She works with individuals to help them achieve optimal health through nutrition and lifestyle changes. She address digestive issues, symptoms from menopause, weight loss, Candida, Fibromyalgia, Diabetes and other chronic conditions. Ellen also hosts workshops and does public speaking on wellness topics such as: Hitting the Restart Button~ Integrating Healthy Habits In The New Year; Healthy Foods That Are Making You Sick, Sugar And The Mood Food Connection, Wellness In The Workplace and others.

September 7, 2011

Embracing Failure

Written by Alicia Marie Fruin

I have heard it said that “if you can’t do it right, then don’t do it at all.”

I wonder how important it really is to always get it “right”? How many times does this philosophy keep us from just taking the next step? Could this just be a strategy designed to play it safe? Do we really think “if I am careful I won’t fail”? Really?

I find that ironic since failure is inevitable.  You will fail…I will fail. We will all hit ceilings of achievement. We will all get stuck. We will all fail now and then. If you are playing in the game of business at all, it will happen. Every choice, effort and move you make has to line up just right to get your intended outcome. It makes sense that it will not happen at times. What is this notion that it is bad to fail really about? Each time we don’t hit our goal it allows us to learn, tweak, re-align our actions and go for it again.

As a business coach, I have noticed that people who are very accomplished have a healthy relationship with failure. They embrace it, watch for it, learn from their mistakes and move on.  Sometimes they even publicize their failures, modeling the kind of leadership they want to see in their employees. They seem to know and understand that who they are is not their job, their business or their results.

Most of us only see these high powered, accomplished individuals when they are in the public and enjoying some measure of success. We do not see the every day struggles, disappointments and failures. On the weekly phone calls with my clients, I have a privileged point of view. I hear the challenges, hesitation, the pain, the disappointment as well as the wins, successes and accomplishments.

Accomplished people seem to understand a simple truth. They are not their mistakes and they are not their behaviors. Both mistakes and behaviors are changeable. They know in their heart that when they fail at something, they are not a failure. When they make a mistake, they are not a mistake. When they do something wrong, they are not wrong. They seem to understand that who they are as a human being is constant. They are people who can fall down, smile, pick themselves up and keep going.

I have also noticed that successful people seem less likely to avoid their emotions such as rejection, guilt, self-doubt, fear, overwhelm and dissatisfaction. Instead they just allow and move through their emotions like a hot knife through butter staying their course regardless of the fear. One of my clients, let’s call him “Joe” would say, “It’s just part of the ride. It is normal to have fear sometimes, to feel lost sometimes, and to be disappointed. I wouldn’t trade any of this for a dull cubicle and a steady paycheck”.

Mastery is a succession of failures, not wins. You have to be bad at something and keep going to master it. Failure and success are events. Whatever emotion or circumstance has been stopping you; I encourage you to embrace the possibility of failure and the emotion that goes with that. If you wait till it feels safe you will have waited too long.  Just take your next step towards your goals today and then again tomorrow and the next day and the next day.

People Biz, Inc. is a coaching and training company that helps clients to achieve measurable transformation in realizing their personal and professional goals. Owner Alicia Marie Fruin has since been coaching, training and helping business owners for over 11 years. Her years of experience as a professional coach, workshop leader and entrepreneur have allowed her to help businesses reach their optimal potential, improving productivity and increasing profits. More information on coaching and training services offered by People Biz, Inc. can be found online at www.peoplebizinc.com or by calling (512) 989-2230.

August 24, 2011

Webinar Series

WEBINAR PRICING:
$39 General Admission
$29 CMI Awardees
Free to Current Coaching Clients of People Biz, Inc.

Register Here!

STRATEGIC PLANNING | Friday, October 14, 2011 | 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM CST
Led by Paula Fracasso
Create a vision statement, mission statement, and practiced values as the foundation for your business plan and culture. Then get step-by-step instruction on how to set goals, build strategies and create action plans in alignment with your culture. This is a great course to do with your team!

HIRING PLAN | Thursday, November 10, 2011 | 2:00 PM – 5:00 PM CST
Led by Alicia Marie
How do you know when it is time to hire?  What role is the right one?  Identify a strategy for building your organization as well as a hiring process for identifying talent.  Save time, money and the headache of a bad hire.

INSPIRED GOALS | Thursday, January 12, 2012 | 2:00 PM – 5:00 PM CST
Led by Alicia Marie
Just another year?  Join us for an enlightening look at how to set goals that inspire, motivate and support your vision. Give yourself the time and space you need to create your goals this year. You have never done a course quite like this one. People who participate report breakthrough results all year long!

DISC TRAINING | Friday, February 24, 2012 | 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM CST
Led by Paula Fracasso
Discover your own behavior and how to relate best with each behavior style. Go beyond the interview and learn to accurately use the DISC Assessment tool when hiring. Learn to effectively coach your employees and/or understand how to best train and manage an employee.
*Tuition is $99 (includes cost of DISC and your in-depth 15 page DISC report)

MASTER COMMUNICATOR | Thursday, March 22, 2012 | 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM CST
Led by Alicia Marie
We learn how to communicate because we want something…to be held, fed, etc. Most of us still communicate for that reason and only that reason, which leads to a control/command style of communication. As most leaders have figured out, “telling and directing” simply doesn’t work well. Yet as leaders, it can seem as if we do not have any choice? We are stuck in that first model of communication. Join us and learn how to shift into an effective communication model of engagement, collaboration and possibility.

COACHING SKILLS FOR MANAGERS | Thursday, April 12, 2012 | 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM CST
Led by Deborah Huyer
Maybe you do not have to know it all or do it all? Join us for a lively discussion about coaching versus managing. Learn how to grow and develop your employees and reap the benefits of leading versus managing. (Master Communicator is a prerequisite for this course.)

RAVE REVIEWS | Thursday, May 17, 2012 | 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM CST
Led by Deborah Huyer
Stop going through the motions of an annual review. Learn how to set yourself, your business and your employees up to win. Write employee reviews that support growth, learn how to give feedback, identify growth opportunities and develop personal development plans with employees.

Register Here!

February 10, 2011

The Coaching Clinic: Coaching Skills for Managers

Two Day Course

Next Public course is March 31st – April 1st in Bellevue, Washington. 

The Coaching Clinic Brochure | Training Registration Form  

Coaching is the quickest and most effective method for developing your employees. A fun, highly participative and practical course designed to provide you and your managers with the tools and skills needed to become an outstanding coach. HCRI Approved Hours: 11.5 hours! Course includes a coaching session with Trainer Alicia Marie as well as a DISC Assessment.

* Learn powerful and effective techniques that help you seize daily coaching situations.

* What coaching is about, why it is effective and how to implement it in the workplace.

* Learn how to make the traditional switch from “Command and Control” style management to collaborative and supportive coaching.

* The use of behavior assessments and how they apply when coaching.

* Identify goals and create action plans with employees.

* Promote learning and discovery in your business.

* Accountability – what it takes and how to infuse your company culture with it.

* Personal Foundation – modeling “Real Power” in the workplace.

I attended a Coaching Clinic that Alicia Marie presented and was amazed at the knowledge that I gained! I originally signed up for just the PHR credit, but left with a whole new awareness of myself, those that I work with and am surrounded by. On a conference call with my supervisor and a few Execs’, we were discussing another employee and it hit me what type of personality each member of the call was! With this newfound knowledge I was able to guide the conversation so everyone was on the same page and I left feeling I now knew exactly how to relate to those that I support daily. I would recommend Alicia’s Coaching Clinic to anyone. I promise you, you will come out of this clinic with a new perspective in everything you deal with!

– Michelle Lopez, PHR , HR Director

January 18, 2011

Alicia Marie Interviewed on Deb Scott’s Radio Show

Click here to listen to Deb Scott’s interview with Alicia Marie on “The Best People We Know” Radio Show.  Alicia Marie discusses different ways to take “mental” advantage of the new year, how and why everyone should set measurable goals, how to get a fresh start in 2011, and much more!

December 21, 2010

So, you were fired. Now what?

So, you were fired.  Now what?  How will you explain it when you interview?

How do you respond to a job interview question about why you left your last job, when the answer is that you were fired?  This question is dreaded by everyone who has ever been laid off.  But it doesn’t have to be that way…

There are many questions that job seekers are asked. “What salary are you looking for?” is a common one.  “Why should we hire you?” is another.  And “Why did you leave your last job?” – this one can leave you spluttering if you were fired and don’t know how to answer, and most people don’t!  After they’ve stumbled through a few answers, trying in vain to phrase it in an acceptable way and are not invited back for a second interview, their fears are confirmed.  No one will hire them because they’ve been fired.

But that’s not what is really happening.  The problem is not that they were fired, but how they answered the question.

We don’t stay at a job our entire lives like our grandparents did.  Not only is it common to change jobs, some believe it’s the best way to leverage salary and a career.  Most of the changes may be of your own volition – odds are a few changes will involve being fired or laid-off.

Companies are bought out, they merge, they down-size, and they consolidate, which means inevitably there’s a duplication of staff.  It can be as simple as the new president wanting to bring in his own team.  He probably didn’t even look at your capabilities; he just decided you were “outta there”.  These departures aren’t as difficult to explain, and your answer can be relatively easy.

The instances that cause real concern feel very personal, even when they aren’t. You are the only one who was dismissed, and what’s more, you know they’ll replace you.  You’re caught off guard, angry, and frightened.  In an instant, you’re on the defensive, which is usually where people remain. And that’s exactly what causes the problem.  Interviewers can spot “victim” mentality from a mile away.  

Firing isn’t always about the individual, even though that’s who is impacted the most.  Sometimes it’s about the boss—especially bosses with issues.  It might be about poor performance, but that’s not always negative. It could be the result of having different philosophies.  For instance, the company may value those who work weekends, nights and holidays.  You prefer to balance your life.

Once you’re fired, you can’t change the circumstances.  But you can control how you view them.  While departmental or companywide layoffs are easier to explain, they can also cause damage.  You wonder, “If I’d been really good, wouldn’t they have found another spot for me?”  In addition, you’re in an insecure place that sometimes is difficult to adjust to.

Take some time to clear some tears or anger.  If you’re tempted to recoil, rehash, threaten revenge or otherwise communicate with your previous employer, don’t.  Remember two words: reference and reputation.  Don’t burn your bridges!  Leave the company gracefully.

During this time you have given yourself, detach yourself from the event and honestly examine what happened. Look at the facts.  That’s the only way you’re going to get any insight and begin adjusting your thoughts and perspective.  There are hundreds of reasons for dismissal, so there is no perfect answer.

The first step, as trite as it sounds, is to look at it as a blessing – an opportunity to grow or move on.  It may take some time to see, but no matter how bad it looks or feels, something good will come of it.  Maybe it will be a better job, a chance to grow, a new business, or the realization that you hated your career – who knows?

If you’re too busy being the angry and defensive victim, not only will you miss the chance to capitalize on the positive outcome, but you’ll also keep experiencing negative consequences.  When you’re in a victimized frame of mind, you’ll miss recognizing an opportunity and continue to perpetuate your unemployment.

The unequivocal rule in an interview is to tell the truth.  If they discover you lied, you’ll be wondering for a long time how you’ll pay your bills.  So when you’re asked why you left, tell them you were fired.  Forthright brevity is best.  It’s all in how you phrase it.  The trick is a shift in perspective, which is easier when you’ve purged the defensiveness and shame.

Don’t give a long, rambling story or blame the company, your boss, or anyone else.  Take full responsibility.  Do not be a victim in any way shape or form.  Did you learn from the experience?  Then by all means, say so. It is okay to say the role, company, or job was not a good fit for me.  Not every job is right for every person.  There are philosophical differences, chemistry problems, tough spots, and bosses who are difficult and self-absorbed.

Regardless of the reason, it wasn’t your perfect job, or you weren’t quite what they needed.  The great thing is that it was recognized (in whatever form) and everyone is moving on.  The goal is to be real about what works for you and why the firing took place.

Let’s examine two answers to the question: “Why did you leave your last job?”

“I don’t know.  I was doing my job.  Most everyone liked me.  They always came to me for advice instead of our boss.  When the other manager left, they promoted the assistant.  She’s maybe about 28.  I guess they thought she’d be good just because she’d been there a long time, but she really was a shrew.  I think she hated me.  She was always talking down to me.  She never did this with the “higher ups”.  One time she took credit for one of my projects.  She’s the one that should have left!  I’m glad to be out of there.”

“I was fired, actually.  The assistant manager was promoted to manager because she had seniority and she was very good at her job.  Unfortunately, she was young and perhaps she thought respect was automatically accorded instead of earned, because when everyone else began coming to me instead of her, it didn’t seem to sit well with her.  Despite that I excelled in my responsibilities and met my goals, she let me go.  I’m sorry to have had to leave the company.  I did learn that I could have been a better communicator and I could have built a relationship with her.  That could have saved my job.  Next time I will work harder on that instead of assume someone knows my intentions.”

Can you spot the differences?  As the interviewer, what would you think?

You must work out a comfortable response.  Rewrite it, rephrase it, and test it.  Be able to say it calmly and sincerely.  If you notice hesitation or discomfort, your words and your attitude (possibly both) need an adjustment.  There is no good or bad.  There’s only perspective, which is your choice.  Firing is considered “bad,” but what’s bad about being fired when a boss has issues?  What’s bad about protecting a customer or not compromising your ethics?  What’s bad about being asked to leave because the position description changed and doesn’t fit your job preferences or skills?  What’s bad about being fired from a sales job for lousy numbers when you hate selling (and realize later that you’re relieved to be gone)?

One last bit of advice:  talk through your responses to interview questions with an objective supporter, like a career counselor or a career coach.  Sometimes we can gain perspective by having a conversation with a neutral party.

Alicia Marie
People Biz, Inc.

December 9, 2010

Targeted Transitions Program

Join Career Coach Deborah Huyer for Targeted Transitions, a teleclass  program specifically designed for professionals who have decided to make a transition, or for those currently seeking new opportunities.

MODULE 1:  Taking Aim“Without knowing where you want to go, you’ll end up nowhere or somewhere you don’t want to be!”

  • Creating your definition of success
  • Understanding the role of culture in company fit
  • Creating a job search strategy, pipeline and spreadsheet to identify roadblocks
  • Creating your elevator pitch and why
  • When are you networking? Always
  • Time commitments
  • Dealing with rejection  – lots of it

MODULE 2:  Targeting your Resume“One size does not fit all.  Being everything to everyone is vanilla – how do you stand out from the crowd?”

  • Understanding your unique value proposition and translating it into a basic resume
  • Tailoring your resume to specific opportunities
  • Resume do’s and don’ts
  • Understanding key words and competencies
  • Researching the company and employees
  • Writing cover letters

MODULE 3: Opening Doors“Getting past the black hole of Applicant Tracking Systems, or how to find and be found.”

  • Employee referrals and networking
  • Job boards and social media
  • Posting your resume
  • Applying for positions
  • The role of key competencies in search criteria

MODULE 4:  You have an interview…now what?“How do you plan for unknown questions and inexperienced interviewers, and have your value shine through?”  Hint: you do not wing it.

  • Preparing for a phone screen or in person interview
  • Anticipating questions based on the job description
  • Preparing for commonly asked questions
  • How to talk yourself out of the job
  • Follow-up

MODULE 5:  Sealing the Deal“It’s yours to lose now.  Learn how to deal with references and negotiating the offer.   By the way, not everything is negotiable!”

  • Requesting and providing references
  • When to talk salary and benefits
  • When and what to negotiate
  • Paperwork / contracts and agreements

WHY DEBORAH?
In addition to her talent as a teacher and her training as a professional coach, she knows the other side of recruiting, having managed recruiting for the past 12 years.  This is a perspective you will not get from traditional sources!

Click here for pricing and to create your customized Targeted Transitions Program.

HR PROFESSIONALS:
This program can also be an affordable outplacement option designed to help your employees in transition.
Click here for more info

Module 1 starts on January 12!  See our calendar for the full schedule.

<!– –>

December 3, 2010

One size does not fit all…

Deborah Huyer - Career Coach

One size does not fit all…when it comes to your resume, that is.

If you are using the same resume for all your job applications, you are doing both yourself and the recruiters a great disservice. 

Here’s why.

Think about your professional career.  You have a wealth of knowledge, skills and experience, all of which cannot possibly be covered in your resume.   (If you could, it would be far too long for someone to wade through, since you only have about 60 seconds to get their attention.)  So you need to pick and choose what you think is the best summary of what you bring to the table.  But what if those that you picked are not relevant to the job you are applying for, and other things that you left off are?

Every time you apply for a position, you need to customize your resume to highlight what past skills and experiences are relevant to that job opportunity.  If you are not doing this, you are wasting a great opportunity for not only you, but the recruiter trying to read through your resume to see if you have what they are looking for.   It’s an opportunity lost.

Isn’t that cheating?  NO!

You’re doing them a favor. How can a recruiter possibly know all of the experience and successes you’ve had in your career by reading through a two page document?  They can’t.  You need to connect the dots between what they are looking for and what you have done in the past.  You need to print out the job description and highlight everything that they are looking for, then you need to identify where and when you have been successful in those areas, and highlight them in your resume.  That’s not lying or cheating – it’s actually the opposite!  You need to be able to provide specific examples once you get to the interview stage.

Doesn’t that take a lot of time?  YES!

If you won’t take the time (an hour) to research and customize your resume for that position, why should they invest time in interviewing you?  Just remember to rename each version of your resume with the company name that you are applying to and file it away so that you have a copy for reference when the recruiter calls.  (And they will, because you’ve made their job easy for them!)

That’s if you can get your resume through the Applicant Tracking System…  Want to know why your resume goes into the black hole of technology, never to be seen by a recruiter? 

I invite you to join my upcoming TeleClass, “Targeting Your Resume: How to Stand Out from the Crowd” on January 19th.  Call 512-989-2230 for details, or send an information request to register@peoplebizinc.com

______________________________________________________________

Article by Deborah Huyer

Deborah has over 20 years of experience as an HR leader, business manager, entrepreneur and consultant, giving her the ability to effectively coach her clients to higher levels of performance and success.

October 28, 2010

“Success Story” – A note from a client

“My coach is Alicia Marie Fruin of People Biz, Inc.  She is absolutely amazing!  I have grown so much (both personally and professionally) since beginning her program at the beginning of the summer.  This is, without question, the BEST investment I have made in my business and myself!

I found her through some business associates (in separate firms) whom I had seen dramatically improve their businesses and asked them what they were doing differently.  I checked out her website and listened to a podcast of a sample coaching session.  I was impressed, and scheduled a free trial coaching session with her.

It wasn’t what I expected–honestly, I didn’t quite know what to expect.  But, Alicia was able to help me sort through my conflicting priorities, overcome obstacles, and focus on the most productive course of action.

As a result, I am executing a solid, workable plan for moving my business to the new, expanded space.  (I was overwhelmed by that before I started coaching.) Plus, I have more balance in my life, time for my family, and I’ve even improved my health and well-being and lost a little weight.

I have become a huge proponent of coaching in the process.  If you are “thinking about it”, you probably already know you need it on some level.  Whether you choose to work with Alicia, or someone else, PLEASE make sure the person you hire is liscensed and trained.  They can do a whole lot of damage if they’re not.”

– Lisa Gaynor, President of Design It With Consignment

September 22, 2010

“Oh Fear” by DeAnne Pearson – A Poem Inspired by Leading Change

 

“Oh Fear” by DeAnne Pearson
A poem inspired by Leading Change

 

Oh fear, oh fear, my old friend,

I have put you on a shelf.

It is not that I don’t expect to see you again,

But while holding onto you, I can’t be myself.

You have poked me and prodded me as a tool,

That I have relied on too long and it has made me still,

And often you have made me the fool.

But, it is time that I live, and you can watch from the window sill.

I have things to do and you weigh me down,

You are keeping me from being who I really am, that is even sadder.

Through Leading Change, that is what I again and again have found-

That each of us, including me, really does matter.

With lots of support and tremendous care of leaders far and near-

Brett, Ed, Mark, Reen, Stacy, Ken, Jess, and Alicia Marie, who I hold dear.

Fear, oh fear, you can’t keep me too busy to be present in my life,

……As artist, writer, Christian, mother, daughter, friend and wife.

_____________________________________________________

www.peoplebizinc.com
www.deannepearson.com

_____________________________________________________